Migrating from godot-rust 0.9.x to 0.10.x

Version 0.10 implements many improvements to ergonomics, naming consistency and bugfixes. Tooling and CI has been majorly overhauled, providing fast feedback cycles, higher confidence and easier-to-read documentation.

This guide outlines what actions users of godot-rust need to take to update their code.

Minimum supported Rust version

The MSRV has been increased to 1.56. When migrating, you will need to ensure that you are using at least Rust 1.56 or later or your projects may fail to build.

We use the Rust 2021 edition; in your own code you may use any edition.

Breaking API changes

This is a brief overview of the smaller breaking changes in the library API. Please refer to the changelog for a comprehensive list.

More sophisticated breaking changes are explained further down in section Migrations.

Changes to modules

The module structure has been simplified to ensure there is only one module per symbol:

  • Module nativescript has been renamed to export.
  • Types nativescript::{Instance, RefInstance} have been moved to object.
  • Less often used macros godot_gdnative_init, godot_gdnative_terminate, godot_nativescript_init, godot_site have been removed from the prelude.
  • Unnecessarily nested modules have also been removed. If you were depending upon the exact path, you will need to use the new path.

Changes to core types

  • The euclid vector library has been removed and replaced with glam.

  • Variant has a redesigned conversion API.

  • Matrix types -- Transform2D, Transform and Basis -- have had their basis vectors renamed from x/y/z to a/b/c, to avoid confusion with the x/y/z vector components.

  • The following deprecated symbols have been removed:

    • Reference::init_ref(unsound)
    • ClassBuilder::add_method, add_method_advanced, add_method_with_rpc_mode
    • ScriptMethod
    • ScriptMethodFn
    • ScriptMethodAttributes
  • The following methods were removed due to being redundant:

    • unsafe access methods for VariantArray<Shared> (available in VariantArray<Unique>)
    • Basis::invert
    • Basis::orthonormalize
    • Basis::rotate
    • Basis::tdotx
    • Basis::tdoty
    • Basis::tdotz
    • Rid::operator_less
    • StringName::operator_less

Various type names have been changed to improve clarity and consistency:

Old Type NameNew Type Name
RefInstanceTInstance
RefKindMemory
ThreadAccessOwnership
TypedArrayPoolArray
ElementPoolElement
SignalArgumentSignalParam
Point2Vector2
Size2Vector2

The following methods have been renamed:

Old MethodNew Method
{String,Variant}::forgetleak
Color::{rgb,rgba}{from_rgb,from_rgba}
Rid::is_validis_occupied
Basis::to_scalescale
Basis::from_elementsfrom_rows
Transform2D::from_axis_originfrom_basis_origin
StringName::get_nameto_godot_string

Changes to procedural macros

  • #[inherit] is now optional and defaults to Reference instead of Node.
  • #[property(before_set)] and its siblings are replaced with #[property(set)] etc.; see below.

Ownership Changes

  • Instance and TInstance now use Own=Shared by default. Some adjustments to your assumptions should be re-evaluated as needed.

New features

In addition to new functionality outlined here, it can be interesting to check the Added section in the changelog.

Cargo features

While these are not breaking changes, the following may be useful to consider when migrating, particularly if you were previously using a custom solution for either of the following:

  • serde is now supported for VariantDispatch and types in the core_types module.
  • Async Foundations have been completed, so you can now make use of Rust async runtimes with Godot more easily. We have a recipe for using async with the tokio runtime.
  • Custom Godot builds are now supported. The advanced guide for Custom Godot has been updated accordingly.

Custom property exports

In godot-rust 0.9, it was necessary to manually register properties using the class builder such as the following:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
#[derive(NativeClass)]
#[inherit(Reference)]
struct Foo {
    #[property]
    bar: i64,
}

#[methods] 
impl Foo {
  fn register_properties(builder: &ClassBuilder<Foo>) {
    builder
        .add_property::<String>("bar")
        .with_getter(get_bar)
        .with_setter(set_bar)
        .with_default(0)
        .done();
  }
  #[export]
  fn set_bar(&mut self, _owner: &Reference, value: i64) {
      self.bar = value;
  }

  #[export]
  fn get_bar(&mut self, _owner: &Reference) -> i64 {
      self.bar
  }
}
}

In 0.10, this can be automated with the #[property] procedural macro, such as the following:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
#[derive(NativeClass)]
#[inherit(Reference)]
struct Foo {
    #[property(name = "bar", set = "set_bar", get = "get_bar", default = 0)]
    bar: i64,
}

#[methods] 
impl Foo {
    #[export]
    fn set_bar(&mut self, _owner: &Reference, value: i64) {
        self.bar = value;
    }

    #[export]
    fn get_bar(&mut self, _owner: &Reference) -> i64 {
        self.bar
    }
}
}

VariantDispatch

VariantDispatch is an newly introduced type in godot-rust 0.10. This enum lets you treat Variant in a more rust-idiomatic way, e.g. by pattern-matching its contents:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
let variant = 42.to_variant();

let number_as_float = match variant.dispatch() {
    VariantDispatch::I64(i) => i as f64,
    VariantDispatch::F64(f) => f,
    _ => panic!("not a number"),
};

approx::assert_relative_eq!(42.0, number_as_float);
}

Migrations

This section elaborates on APIs with non-trivial changes and guides you through the process of updating your code.

Variant

If you were using the Variant::from_* methods, those no longer exist.

In 0.9.x you would need to use the specific constructor, such as the following:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
let variant = Variant::from_i64(42);
let variant = Variant::from_f64(42.0);
let variant2 = Variant::from_object(object);
}

In 0.10.x, new() is sufficient for any type that implements ToVariant, such as the following:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
let variant = Variant::new(42);
let variant = Variant::new(42.0);
let variant2 = Variant::new(object);
}

When converting from a variant to a Rust type, it previously was necessary to do the following:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
let integer64 = i64::from_variant(&variant_i64).unwrap();
let float64 = f64::from_variant(&variant_f64).unwrap();
let object = ObjectType::from_variant(&variant_object).unwrap();
}

In 0.10.x, you can now cast your variants by using the to() function on FromVariant-enabled types, such as the following:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
// Note: If the compiler can infer your type, the turbofish `::<T>` is optional
let integer64 = variant.to::<i64>().unwrap();
let float64 = variant.to::<f64>().unwrap();
let object = variant.to_object::<ObjectType>().unwrap(); // returns Ref<ObjectType>
}

Transforms

Previously, transforms were defined by the matrix identities such as m11, m12; now, they are referred by the vector name for consistency.

For example: When creating an identity Transform2D in 0.9.x, you would create it using the following code:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
let tform = Transform2D::new(1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0);
}

In 0.10.x you now need to create it using from_basis_origin and use a, b, and origin vectors, such as the following:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
let tform = Transform2D::from_basis_origin(
    Vector2::new(1.0, 0.0),
    Vector2::new(0.0, 1.0),
    Vector2::new(1.0, 1.0),
);
}

Vector types

The underlying vector library as well as the implementation have been fundamentally replaced. In 0.9.x, many of the goemetric types were thinly wrapping a separate library. This led to several wrapping classes such as Point2, Size2 being removed now. In addition, other geometric types -- for example Rect2, Quat, Transform, Plane -- have all been changed, and certain convenience functions may not be available anymore, depending upon the struct.

For example: Rect2 no longer has width() or height(), but lets you directly access its size.x or size.y fields.

ClassBuilder

The ClassBuilder type has been extended to use the builder pattern when registering signals and properties.

In 0.9, registering a signal would look like the following:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
fn register_signals(builder: &ClassBuilder<Self>) {
  builder.add_signal(
    Signal {
      name: "signal1",
      args: &[],
    }
  );
  builder.add_signal(
    Signal {
      name: "signal2",
      args: &[SignalArgument {
          name: "myArg",
          default: 42.0.to_variant(),
          export_info: ExportInfo::new(VariantType::F64),
          usage: PropertyUsage::DEFAULT,
      }],
  });
}
}

In 0.10, this changes to:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
fn register_signals(builder: &ClassBuilder<Self>) {
  builder.signal("signal1").done();
  
  builder.signal("signal2")
    .with_param_custom(
      SignalParam {
          name: "myArg",
          default: 42.0.to_variant(),
          export_info: ExportInfo::new(VariantType::F64),
          usage: PropertyUsage::DEFAULT,
      },
    ).done();

  // If you only need a default value, you can also register a signal like this:
  builder.signal("signal3")
    .with_param_default("myArg", 42.0.to_variant())
    .done()
}
}

Server singletons

Godot's server singletons have received a safety overhaul. As a result, all functions that take one or more parameters of type Rid are now marked unsafe and thus require being used inside an unsafe block or unsafe function.

In 0.9.x, creating a canvas_item and attaching it to a parent would be done as follows:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
let vs = unsafe { VisualServer::godot_singleton() };
let canvas = vs.canvas_create();
let ci = vs.canvas_item_create();
vs.canvas_item_set_parent(ci, canvas);
}

In 0.10.x, you now must wrap the canvas_item_set_parent function in an unsafe block, such as follows:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
let vs = unsafe { VisualServer::godot_singleton() };
let canvas = vs.canvas_create();
let ci = vs.canvas_item_create();
unsafe {
  vs.canvas_item_set_parent(ci, canvas);
}
}

Additional UB notes

The reason for this change was due to issue #836 being raised. Developers were able to demonstrate that you could easily cause undefined behavior when using any function that accepted Rid as a parameter, such as the following:


#![allow(unused)]
fn main() {
let vs = unsafe { VisualServer::godot_singleton() };
let canvas = vs.canvas_create();
let vp = vs.viewport_create();
vs.canvas_item_set_parent(vp, canvas); // crashes immediately
vs.canvas_item_set_parent(canvas, canvas); // crashes at shutdown
}